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Bike!Bike! 2010

Bike!Bike! 2010 was hosted in Toronto, Ontario by Bike Pirates, from August 12-14, 2010.

Bike!Bike! 2010 poster

Contents

Summary

A few workshops were cancelled and a few had no facilitation. Four workshops were held at a time, each with about fifty people attending.

Bike Bike 2010 organizers would like to thank the pack of dedicated volunteers that operated the kitchen and supplied people with breakfast, lunch and dinner for four days. Organic, vegan and gluten-free food was provided to all. You helped make it possible.

Some Bike Bike delegates from the states where surprised to see how many cyclists ride Toronto's narrow urban streets.

The first night, there was a picnic-style dinner in the park. The next night, there was a scavenger hunt and an outdoor movie night in park followed by a midnight swim on the shores of Lake Ontario. After the workshops on Saturday, some delegates were taken on a tour of Toronto's five DIY bike spaces. Then after the tour, there was hot and steamy all-night dance party fun.

On Sunday, there was a group discussion to plan for future BikeBikes. It was decided that the next Bike!Bike! 2011 will be held in San Marcos, Texas. Fargo was asked to hold a winter bike bike. Forty people came in from Montreal, Canada. They will be committing a regional bike bike named velo velo in the end of September, 2010. There was some talk of New York hosting a regional bike bike. Delegates from Los Angeles showed interest in hosting bike bike in 2012 but that will be decided in San Marcos. New Orleans group Plan B wishes to host the tenth anniversary of bike bike 2013.

Workshops

In the overview, please make mention of the facilitators, format of the workshop, and whatever other information you might think helpful. The overview should contain a description of the topic but no record of what happened in the workshop. Feedback is meant to be a constructive aid for those who ran the workshop; keep in mind many of the facilitators had no prior experience with this type of workshop before this conference.

Don't be afraid to make changes to someone else's work if you can make any improvements.

3-Speed Hubs and the trouble with Sexism

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Anti-Racism!

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Battlefield: Consensus!

Overview

This workshop was run by one member of the Right To Move and some others probably too. The turnout was large, probably about 40 people. The workshop was run like a real workshop with the participants interacting with each other and then commenting on what was perceived.

Notes

The workshop started with each participant choosing another participant under the condition that the two had not yet met. Each person introduced themselves and described their shop. Afterwards each person was asked to introduce their partner and talk about their shop. What was observed was that each person had a pre-conceived notion of what queations were important to ask and on top of that, what answers were important to speak about or remember. This was to demonstrate that we all do not think in the same way, often this causes conflicts because two people can be focussed on different details of an argument. This can also be a benefit since sometimes we forget to ask questions that others may think of.

In the next stage, a group of 7 or so participants were chosen at random and put in the center of the group. They were given a scenario which needed a decision in 20 minutes.

Feedback

I found it great that an actual workshop was offered, many of us know how concensus works but often don't work at improving how we use it. Unfortunately there were too many people to effeciently achieve this as one group, perhaps seperating into more groups may have been more beneficial. The first stage was very enlightening but the second was less so since it did not involve everyone and also, those that were involved did not have experience working with one another (and sometimes with concensus at all). --Godwin 20:07, 24 August 2010 (UTC)

Bike Advocacy/Working with the City

Overview

Working with the following 5 distinct groups is a comprehensive approach to bicycle advocacy. During the workshop, the group discussed various ways they have engaged each group and either found challenges or success.

1. Professional Organizations

2. Local News

3. Police/Fire Department

4. City Council

5. ????

Notes

IDEAS: - Bike sauce Toronto: they have a bike advocacy position on the board of directors. - Bike Sauce motto: Learn how to fix your bike and fix your city - go to all events - be members of other bike/ped/green organizations - look for examples and precendents from other cities for new programs - when doing advocacy work, individuals from EAB can speak for themselves. Also, EAB can do the research and educational materials, and we can promote events. - we should have a dedicated PR person - We can write letters to the editor - W/ PR, have some agreed upon talking points before going public - For events, paint a picture of what will be happening

Feedback

Bike Book Club!

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Bike Polo! Mallet making and game

Overview

This workshop ended up having to be cancelled, and was replace by another workshop in the same time slot.

Notes

Feedback

Bike Sharing!

Overview

Notes

  • Have education as a component so people take better care of bikes
  • Check-in/Check-out done through rec-center, can use web-interface
  • Waiver & be sure bike is in reasonably good order
  • Need to be a member of the co-op in order to be eligible to borrow?
    • Can be a good incentive for people to become members at Free Ride
  • Can buy a bike and get 1/2 back for what they pay
    • Somebody can buy a fixed-up bike and then return the bike to get 1/2 of their money back when they are done with the bike if returned within three months. This would be like a library bike system except that it is OK if they end up keeping the bike permanently
    • Also makes the price of borrowing depend on the bike and can scale to let people borrow the nicer bikes so they are not limited to only the bad ones
    • Problem: The shop that does this has no effective way to keep track of "returned-donated" (money back) versus "donated" (tax-deductible receipt only) other than word of mouth and little scraps of paper.
  • Keep designation simple, one group make all the bikes the same color. The library became known as the "yellow bike program"
  • Some groups used an open-source software to keep track. I think it was called something like bike-a-ma-jiggy developed by Andrew Hall and Bernetts? (Not sure on spelling, etc.)
  • http://www.ibike.org/encouragement/freebike/details.htm

Feedback

Bike Touring: Skillshare

Overview

facilitators: Daniel and Courtney from SF, Ricky from Santa Barbara, Willie from New Orleans

40 or 50 of us gathered in the shade outside diabolo's cafe on the U of T campus to talk about bike touring. workshop participants who had toured to toronto from montreal, kalamazoo, troy, and beyond shared their experiences. the major message was that bike touring is a fantastic, cheap, sustainable way of life that everyone should try at some point. lots of methods and strategies for making super-cheap diy equipment (stoves, panniers, bags, etc.) and super-cheap-and-delicious camping food were discussed.

Notes

here's what Courtney, one of the facilitators, emailed out to workshop participants:

This is Courtney of the Bike Touring Workshop. Thanks for being so patient with me and this email of links that I promised. Guess what! I'm on bike tour! So it took me a little while to get to a place where I could type in all your emails. Here's a few links to get you started. I know there are more out there but I wanted to get these out right away while you're all still interested.
Here's the site for making your own stoves. This is pretty extensive. All of them work. The best thing to remember is that anything will work. You can use a nothing more than pool of alcohol in a can and light it on fire. Set a pot hovering above it and your food will cook. Some are more efficient than others but the cat can idea is really useful when all else fails (due to weather or altitude restrictions). (it's also really helpful when you want to just finish a dish off, like cooking pasta, and your stove ran out of fuel and it won't light up again for a couple minutes because you're 4 km above sea level)
http://zenstoves.net/Stoves.htm
The penny stove is pretty amazing and my favorite. It's a little more complicated to make but not much more. You can find it here
http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/stoveinstruct.html
This is a collection of blogs. The best way to learn is from other people who have already done it. You can read all kinds of blogs from all over the world here.
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/
Someone wanted bike touring in winter suggestions. This guy has done it. Touring in the winter can be fun but challenging. I wouldn't recommend running out to the middle of nowhere Alaska on your first bike tour (into the wild?) but the real challenge is staying warm and using all the usually winter bike techniques.
http://www.bicycletouring101.com/InterviewWinterTouringTony.htm
Tooting my own horn:
http://biketourperu.blogspot.com
Making Panniers is really very easy. You can do it out of anything. You just need hooks and some bungies to strap it down at the bottom to keep your bag from jumping off the rack. Here's a classic DIY pannier. It's great because it's waterproof and durable. A little on the heavy side but once you have all the weight on your bike you don't notice much difference.
http://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?o=1gci&doc_id=1841&v=v
You can go to the hardware store and buy the hooks you saw on the last link or you can buy nice pannier hooks. Now that I've used the hardware store kind for so long, I kind of covet these.
http://www.google.com/products?q=pannier+hooks&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=yGd0TMjKN8GC8gbxrtj1CA&sa=X&oi=product_result_group&ct=title&resnum=1&ved=0CDUQrQQwAA
Ok! If you don't want me to keep sending you ideas about bike touring, just let me know and I'll stop. Otherwise I hope to have more ideas. If you have any you'd like to pass along, let me know as well! I love to learn.
Yay Bike Tour! Go Tyvek!
Courtney

Feedback

i thought it was pretty rad. thanks, facilitators! for sharing your knowledge and enthusiasm —chris from troy

Bikes + Universities

Overview

Notes

Feedback

BooP/Thinktank/bikewiki brainstorm

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Cargo bikes!

Overview

The cargo bikes session was lead by members of the Troy Bike Rescue (www.troybikerescue.org), and in particular Dakota Callahan and Andrew Lynn. The presentation was a picture powerpoint accompanied by discussions and Q&A regarding DIY cargo bike creation and use. The aim of the discussion was to see what the role of the cargo bike will play in our pedal powered revolution, and how we can make them a integral part of our shops and our daily lives.

Notes

Many of the attendees were interested in building their own cargo bikes for their shops or personal use. Such things were discussed as how to build jigs, what type of steel is ideal, how to determine what kind of steel you are using, and what kind of wheel systems are most efficient.

Jigs: @TBR we use an assortment of basic jigs to achieve our main goals with bicycles. These main goals are to either A) Extend bicycles or B) make them taller. We use a large PVC pole that is the same diameter as a standard head tube for the purpose of stacking head tubes and maintaining proper alignment, as well as using long sets of angle iron and clamps to align bottom brackets so that multiple frames extended remain straight.

Type of steel: More info later when i am not at work

Wheel systems: 2 wheel systems seem to be the best choice for most situations and light to medium cargo-ing-ness. 2 wheels are easier to pull along than the traditional 4 (2 on bike and 2 on trailer) as well as maintain stability at higher speeds. Anyone who has dragged a trailer before can attest to the sometimes awkwardness of high speed travel with a non leaning load on the back of the bike.

that being said, heavy weight and low speed is easily dealt with on a 2 wheel trailer, as many of us have seen before with other peoples mobile clinics and general cargo usage.

Feedback

Co-Op Incubator Program

Overview

Notes

Getting volunteers
  • Try a volunteer exchange
    • A fun idea brought up where different cities provide housing for visitors to work in a different shop for a period of time
  • Develop a mission statement and review regularly to keep the organization on track
    • One of the first things newcomers learn about is the mission statement
  • Wrench 10 shifts, 2 hour orientation, use a D-list specifically for shadows, quarterly "cooks" meeting (Bike kitchen)
    • Shadower workbook that is like an interactive quiz that can be signed off
  • Staff (council) must all wrench at some point, some minimum amount.
    • Everyone must be involved in the shop
  • Weekly potluck
  • Staff-only nights have been helpful
    • Sopo has tried a few things are really like the staff-only nights
  • Keep track of active/inactive "cooks" (Staff)
    • Have a way for people to keep track
  • Use shiftboard and an appointment book to schedule people
  • Pizza & Beer every Saturday after shop closes, makes an informal and fun environment


Space
  • Find community leaders & politicians about finding space.
    • Must be persistent with asking
    • Highlight value to why this is a good use of the space
    • Establish a community interest
      • Network and publish annual report to make success publicly known

Feedback

Cooperating with for-profit bike shops

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Design and Organization of Teaching in Your Space

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Facilitating a paid position in your shop

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Grant writing and Government Contracts

Overview

Notes

Earned Income

  • Inconsistent for some
    • (Vancouver says their shop has fairly consistent income flow)
  • Some question making profit from donations (bikes) but it can easily be worded to show its positive side
  • Adopt-a-bike idea is another way to earn money, bikes are paid by suggested donation
  • Money can be earned though bike sharing, if only though late fees
  • Repairs:
    • Some shops do them, some don't
    • Some shops that do, do not guarantee a return time, in fact warn customers that they may not get their bikes back for a long time but many customers support the idea enough to be okay with that

Private Funding

  • Lots of potential sources
  • Create partnerships with similar organizations
  • Do some research and find out what an organization funds
    • Often listed on their website
    • Some organizations only put funding into very specific areas of interest but you can often find one part of your organization that fits into one of these areas
    • For example, Norco will put finding into parts but not into non-tangible items
  • Call an organizations personally and create a relationship with the person/people who actually have a say in who gets funding
  • Start by writing small proposals and work up to larger ones
  • Many organizations with not be the sole funders, they want to see that your organization is sustainable and seeing that you have multiple funding sources puts them at ease
    • Usually 50% or less
  • Full support from private funders should not be relied on for the long-haul as it cannot be counted on from year to year
  • Have a set of written rules or constitution to abide by as to what concessions your organization is willing to make for funding
    • Ex: We will not include an advertisement or logo on our shop front
    • These rules should be agreed on and followed by everyone but can be changed as needed
  • Having a volunteer or employee that is dedicated to writing grants can be key

Government Grants and Contracts

  • Generally not lenient with deadlines and working outside of the agreement as private organizations
  • Often do not pay upfront but your organization must first have the money to fund itself for a few months until it applies to be refunded
    • Requires that you have some money in the first place or that you take out a loan

Feedback

Greening our Green Transportation

Overview

Notes

Feedback

How to teach “hands off”

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Kids' Bike Programming

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Reaching New Immigrants

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Recycled Bike Art!

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Regional Bike!Bike! Report back

Overview

Notes

Feedback

i wasn't at this workshop, but this seems like a prudent space to mention that Newark's Brick City Bike Collective wants to host BikeBike Northeast 2011! this year's hosts, Troy Bike Rescue, think that is a great idea. click here to read&view a small mediareportback on BBNE2010.

Repair Classes as an Outreach tool

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Vanquishing the Storage Monster

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Volunteer Orientation Part 1: telling folks how you work and plugging them in

Overview

Notes

High Level

  • Boise: have definition for volunteer and communicate mission
    • Can make a distinction between volunteering and work-trade. Free Ride does not, but other shops do
Designing an orientation
  • Highlight how every bit of work fits into helping out in the big picture
  • What goals do we have for what volunteers can be?
  • Build expectations and give them to members & volunteers
  • What do volunteers get out of helping out? (Try to come up with at least 3 things)

Implementation Details

  • Brake into small groups; explain the shop & emphasize the *mission*
  • May want to vary the frequency and scheduling of the orientation (Other groups have 1/month with about 20 people at each orientation


Separate into 2 sections
    • Introduction
    • First steps in being trained (scraping bikes or some other hands-on activity, like doing a safety check maybe)
      • The hands-on activity becomes like and initiation process, allowing people to become part of the group
Process for Orientation
  • Talk to Sopo (Atlanta I think) & Boise projects to learn more about the details of their process
  • Use a "workbook" with specific skills. Each skill can be signed-off and when completed a person has finished "training."

Extra Discussion

  • (Association of management of volunteers) Volunteer intake should be made long and arduous with several steps
    • People who are a good fit will make it through the steps and others will get self-eliminate
  • Role playing is fun & brings active participation to orientation
  • Follow-up: personalized thank-you.
    • Be sure to follow-up quickly to have a good impact
    • One group mails out hand-made cards to everybody
  • Elevate the position of being Volunteer as something very important and something to have pride in

Feedback

Volunteer Orientation Part 2: Mechanical orientation, tips and tricks for new wrenchers

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Volunteer Retention and Burnout

Overview

A discussion of common problems and possible solutions for lack of volunteer retention and volunteer burnout. This workshop was facilitated by Zoe of the Brick City Bike Collective and Godwin of The Bike Root. It was divided in half by both topics and on each half, a go around was done to identify the most common problems then a brainstorming session was done to see if possible solutions could be found to many of the problems. Approximately 40 people turned out.

Notes

Retention

Why do we lose volunteers?

  • Sometimes the work they do starts to feel meaningless
  • Volunteers may not get the help needed and may get frustrated
  • Organizing meetings can be very long
  • Don't feel qualified
  • Don't feel empowered or welcome to start organizing
  • May leave once the weather turns foul


Solutions:

  • Volunteer nights
    • approximately 3 hours long
    • one every week or two weeks
  • Talk to volunteers, see what they want to do
    • Have one-on-one meetings to ensure that volunteers are interested in what they are doing
    • Keep occasional volunteers interested and you'll get more long-term volunteers and mechanics
  • Develop a volunteer structure
    • Create a tiered setup with specific volunteer levels and rewards
    • Have dedicated roles with written job descriptions
  • Identify what the boring tasks are
  • Make a task list or binder
  • Make it Social

Burnout

Causes:

  • Not resolving problems
  • Feeling like no one else will do it
  • Loss of interest

Solutions:

  • Behind the scenes work
    • Burnout notice
    • Talk with the volunteers
    • Offer a sabbatical
    • Plan a group retreat to talk about issues
  • Have more honesty in meetings
    • Have meetings to only discuss and vent volunteer issues
  • Don't plan long-term putting out fires
  • Rotate tasks
    • Write out tasks in a book
  • Make a policy that when only one volunteer shows up, close the shop and walk away

Feedback

Winter Riding Skill-share

Overview

This workshop covered safety issues and how to deal with the winter fashion police (i.e. how to dress appropriately!). As a group we discussed different ideas to get more people to ride during the winter months.

Notes

  • Ideas to get more people to ride in winter
    • Coldest day of the year ride & January 1st rides
    • A box with donated winter riding clothes (e.g. extra gloves, sweaters, waterproofs etc.)
    • Ice polo / Ice races
    • Taking kids/others to parking lots (or other secluded / car-free spaces) to show them how much fun winter riding is!
    • Pledge signing / peer pressure: "I swear to not use a car for the duration of the winter"

Feedback

Women and Trans Hours: Policies, Politics, Allies

Overview

Notes

In Davis, Women/Trans/Femme Night allows men who are core volunteers to attend one meeting with permission in advance only, to give them a sense of what happens/how it works when they aren't around. We also found that putting out large, painted signs has helped significantly for passers-by to understand that this isn't open shop.

Feedback

Yoga for Cyclists

Overview

Notes

Feedback

Bike!Bike! International Conferences
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Regional Southeast 2009 (Atlanta) · Southeast 2012 (Birmingham)